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Late. Mr. Anil Rana
“To make the journey of life eventful I chose the intruded way and at...
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Water
Janhit Foundation takes a three pronged approach to dealing with water issues in Uttar Pradesh. This approach is based upon ensuring...
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Child Line
CHILDLINE is India’s first 24-hour, toll-free, emergency phone outreach service for children in need of care and protection, linking them to.....
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Rain Water
Rain Centres are a network of permanent exhibitions that seek to spread water literacy among urban Indians. They define the role played...
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Agriculture
Janhit Foundation has been promoting organic agriculture as a viable, sustainable alternative to conventional farming practices throughout...
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environment projects
Creating a balance between the rapid urbanization vis-a-vis growing air pollution and social forestry in Urban Meerut
Mitigation of air pollution in developing countries like India has emerged as one of the challenging tasks for environmental management agencies. The status is small towns is likely to become likely to become more acute with the continued and enhanced rate of expansion and increase in vehicular pollution and the limitations of carrying capacity of the respective environmental basins. India being a developing country, end-of-pipe treatment alone is not techno-economically feasible and control emission of vehicles is not feasible because of exorbitant costs. It is a known fact that green belts (GB) or vegetation around polluted areas mitigate air pollution (as the plants serve as a sink for pollutants and check the flow of dust, etc.) and reduce noise levels.
In 2002, Janhit Foundation conducted the Pollution study of Meerut in association with Centre for Science and Environment, New Delhi and the study revealed the presence of Suspended Particulate and Respiratory Particulate Matter in much higher quantities than permissible. Following this, Janhit Foundation went ahead with analyzing the cause of such high pollution levels.
Against this backdrop, Janhit Foundation did tree plantation and rainwater harvesting for the establishment and maintenance of a green belt in the school premises of City Vocational Public School, Meerut. As a part of the programme, following activities were conducted –
An Enviro-Green Centre has been established wherein trees have been planted, with an active participation of students and community members offering their ‘shramdaan’. 300 trees of gulmohar, avla, anjir, satavar, sarpghandha, safed massoli, stivia, alovera, lemongrass, mangoe, guava, lemon, neem and peepalsata varieties have been planted. These plants and trees have been selected because of their medicinal value and survival rate as well as the fact that increasing the green cover increases oxygen.
1500 students have actively participated in voluntarily helping in tree plantation and maintenance of the trees and plants and the area in which they are planted. The green belt is now being maintained by the eco club in the school.
A Rainwater Harvesting structure has been constructed which is now functioning as a live model. On an average, this structure harvests 80,000 litres of water annually which is further used by the school for different purposes.
Interactive sessions have been held in the school to make the teachers and the students understand the importance of the project and to solicit their cooperation in the project.
Biodiversity Farm established at Meerut
Janhit Foundation being involved into the promotion of organic farming since its inception realized that alongwith promoting sustainable agriculture, there was also a dire need for enhancing the biodiversity of the state. The organisation came up with a project supported by The Royal Netherlands Embassy, New Delhi, wherein it envisaged setting up a model biodiversity farm in a nearby village (Bhatipura) in order to set an example for the farmers in and around to adopt the same and contribute in conserving the gradually diminishing biodiversity. The model farm was set up in 2007. The farm was constructed in a way that it included almost everything that would form a part of the natural environment. Through this model the organisation tried to form a natural eco system comprising of a small triangular pond, a hut made from straw and bamboo shoots, a farm spread across an area of 2 and a half acre of land, some organic manuring pits and structures, bee keeping boxes etc. Focus was laid on almost all aspects of traditional ways of farming keeping in mind the upcoming ways of income enhancement. The small pond was constructed to encourage fish rearing amongst the farmers and also to educate them about the importance of water and its judicious use in farming.
Apiculture, a new business trend has been encouraged for producing organic honey as an additional source of income. Floriculture, production of organically grown fruits, vegetables and pulses were also encouraged. Flowers like Gladiolas and Rajnigandha were grown in the farm alongwith fruits like mango, guava and jamun. Vegetables like potato, green leafy vegetables and pulses like arhar, urad and moong were also grown. Neem, jatropha, turmeric and stevia were also cultivated taking into consideration the rising demand of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants (MAPs). Promotion of intercropping was also a key objective of the project. The farmers were also enlightened about the low cost irrigation technologies available in the market. A rain gun was also installed into the farm to provide a live demonstration to the farmers. These technologies use water sparingly, thereby putting reasonable burden on the ground water resources. Preparation of organic manures with the use of on farm inputs like farm waste, cow dung, cow urine, rotten leaves etc. were also demonstrated to the farmers through the manuring structures like NADEP, LADEP and Cow Pat Pit (CPP). Also the composts like vermicomposts and liquid manures like vermiwash which are prepared with the help of the excreta of earthworms, were promoted. Other liquid manure models set up for the farmers’ learning were jeevamrit and haritpaani, both derived from on farm inputs. The hut that has been constructed in the farm served as the training centre for the farmers who showed interest into adopting the concept in their farms as well. Continuous trainings were given to farmers to educate them about the importance of biodiversity and that each element forms an integral part of sustainable agriculture. Even if a single element goes missing the balance gets disturbed. Thus the project not only concentrated on increasing the biodiversity of the region but also on the enhancement of the soil quality, water availability, dependence on livestock and in the end towards the income enhancement of the farmer. The farm was developed by the organisation after getting inspired by the model farm developed by Deepak Shujde in Maharashtra.